Interesting


At the Mercy of the Doctor

Glenside Hospital Museum

History is often portrayed as a series of narratives in which great men (and they always seem to be men) changed the world with their strength and leadership, intellect or malevolence. This view of history has been challenged, as economic, social and cultural factors can be shown to be more influential than the actions of […]

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In Remembrance: capturing the history of war is not easy

Glenside Hospital Museum

This Remembrance Weekend GHM would like to thank all our visitors who gave us their family stories. Their contributions have been added to our collection to share with the generations to come. They help us remember the soldiers who came to Beaufort War Hospital during the First World War. In 2014, we began to research […]


The Lunatic Asylum Ball

Glenside Hospital Museum

Bristol Lunatic Asylum took leisure activities for patients seriously. It was seen as part of supporting the patients to regain their health. They had a small library and organised a number of sports activities including cricket. Each week they had a concert which most of the patients attended. In 1864 bagatelle boards and a skittle […]

Asylum ball detail

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One day, two performances, 15 July at Museum

Glenside Hospital Museum

alldaybreakfast presents UNLOCKED a site-specific performance installation at Glenside Hospital Museum. Directed by Lily Mcleish An atmospheric site-specific performance in Glenside Hospital Museum, in the grounds of the former Bristol Lunatic Asylum. The performance gives voice to the patient, interweaving words found in the museum archives, accounts from former patients and experiences of people who […]


The Padded Cell Part 2: the most frequent visitor

Glenside Hospital Museum

In the late nineteenth century the medical journals of Bristol Lunatic Asylum list which patients were placed in the seclusion room.  The name which occurs most often was Hannah Llewellyn. Over a number of years starting in 1873 she was regularly placed there, usually the reason given was ‘excitement’ or ‘fighting’(Medical Journals, BRO 40513/J/7 and […]

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June 11 or June 12 Rare opportunity to draw in Museum

Glenside Hospital Museum

Drawing classes. An amazing opportunity to put pen to paper in the fascinating museum of the former Bristol Lunatic Asylum, led by a qualified teacher. Following the success of our the drawing class in February we have asked Caroline Pringle to return to the museum for two more occasions to run the class. A Sunday […]


The Padded Cell Part 1

Glenside Hospital Museum

At Glenside Hospital Museum there is a replica of a padded cell, a small room with cushioned walls. One panel is thought to be from the late nineteenth century, you can see layers of colour as the room got repainted from pink, to blue and then pale yellow, another panel is the door from the […]

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Alice Cox

Children at the Asylum, forgotten pasts: Part 3

Glenside Hospital Museum

To rescue their forgotten pasts I have chosen a further four children to illustrate the diversity of their health problems and experience in the asylum.   Henry Kane   Henry Kane was admitted on May 24th 1898 from the Bristol Union Workhouse. He died of tuberculosis seven months later. Aged 15 he suffered from what […]


Children in the asylum: Part 2

Glenside Hospital Museum

Admissions of children aged 11 to 16 As the age of those admitted increases there are profound differences. To be able to make comparisons I developed a database. The analysis shows there were more of them: twenty-three 15-year-olds and forty 16-year-olds. Their chances of recovery improved with age; 46% of those aged 15 or 16 […]

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Young children in the Asylum: Part 1

Glenside Hospital Museum

The asylum admission books record many tragic stories but the most heartrending were of children admitted to the asylum. There were not many; 96 or 1.8% of the admissions between 1861–1900 were children aged 16 or under and of these only ten were under 11. The youngest was Rosina Smith who was admitted aged just […]


Discovering Glenside Through its Objects #5: Every name is a number

Glenside Hospital Museum

  One wall of the museum is devoted to a series of black and white photographs of patients from the nineteenth century. The images are of men and women, old and young, mostly from working or trade backgrounds. Some are housewives, some are maids and there are a smattering of artists and artisans. Sitting just […]

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Discovering Glenside Through its Objects #4: Creature Comforts

Glenside Hospital Museum

One area of the museum has been dressed as it would have been during Glenside’s pauper lunatic asylum days, using the original furniture from the  Victorian Board Room. There is a large mahogany dining table and chairs to seat twelve. The lower half of the room has the original dark wood panelling. Above, the walls […]


Epilepsy and the Lifton Family

Glenside Hospital Museum

Nowadays epilepsy is not seen as a psychiatric condition and a person with epilepsy is unlikely to be treated by a mental health unit. In the nineteenth century it was different as the Lifton family were to discover. In 1861, when Bristol Lunatic Asylum opened, the Liftons were a fairly prosperous family. Isaac and his […]

EPILEPSY PART 2 Dennis Reed

Colin and Ann Blannin

‘Unlocked’ exhibition at the City Hall 20th-24th February 10am-3pm

Glenside Hospital Museum

  Alldaybreakfast with ‘Unlocked’, a Creative Seed Council funded project. The exhibition aims to engage audiences in discussion about mental health through art. Working as artists in residence at the Glenside Hospital Museum (which was formerly known as the Bristol Lunatic Asylum in the 1800s) the group developed the exhibition using the museum’s exhibits to […]


Epilepsy in the Asylum

Glenside Hospital Museum

When I was a nursing assistant working on an elderly male psychiatric ward in the early 1980s I witnessed patients having grand mal epileptic fits about once a week. At first I found it quite frightening, but later I became quite blasé about it, although I did wonder why they were so common. Epilepsy only […]

EPILEPSY PART 1 Dennis Reed

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Bringing our collection to life

Glenside Hospital Museum

Participants at GHM’s Drawing Class last week set about capturing our collection on paper. Using the technique of pencil and ink wash they created strong, powerful images. After some quick 10 minute drawings – a sample of the many produced are below – they moved into the heart of the museum. (See Andrew Eddington’s picture […]


Drawing Class at Glenside Hospital Museum

Glenside Hospital Museum

Not to be missed. For anyone who would like to learn or perfect drawing a quick sketch of something that interests you in a gallery or museum this drawing and ink wash class at Glenside Hospital Museum will be a delight. Friday 3rd February 2017 1.45pm til 4.30pm Drawing Class Captured on Paper with Caroline […]

Drawing Class

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Language and Disability: who cares? (I do)

Glenside Hospital Museum

Laurine Groux-Moreau reflects on language and disability at the History of Place event which took place at the MShed on Saturday 3rd December 2016. This was originally published on Laurine’s blog  Language and Disability: who cares? (I do) https://ohmyfrenchness.co.uk/en/home/language-and-disability-talk-at-mshed/ For a few months now I have been involved with History of Place, a national project […]


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‘Good roast beef with potatoes, cabbage and gravy’: asylum food 1861 -1900

Glenside Hospital Museum

Patients Arthur Nichols and John Weston both write about the asylum food. Their experiences can be compared to both the official reports from the Asylum Visitors and Commissioners and other documentation on the asylum farm and menus. Most of the time Nichols viewed the food quite favourably, which is interesting considering he was from a […]